Tamarack Fire explodes to 21,000 acres, no containment | Evacuations, maps, updates

by 24USATVJuly 18, 2021, 8 a.m. 18
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According to the latest update from the U.S. Forest Service, the fire has burned 21,000 acres and has yet to be contained.

MARKLEEVILLE, Calif. — Gusty winds, dry fuels and low humidity has caused the Tamarack Fire to explode to 21,000 acres, according to the U.S. Forest Service on Saturday.

The forest service said the fire is burning in a northerly direction with a backing towards Highway 89 south of Markleeville towards the Carson River.



Fire crews are working on the ground and by air to minimize the spread of the fire. Firefighters will continue increasing efforts to suppress the Tamarack Fire burning near Markleeville in Alpine County.

The evacuation center was moved Saturday afternoon to the Douglas County Community Senior Center in Gardnerville, Nevada, according to the Alpine Sheriff's Office. The original center was in Markleeville.

As fire crews continue to work to protect the community of Markleeville as the fire encroaches on the community and its surrounding areas. The fire has destroyed three buildings, according to the U.S. Forest Service.

A local hotshot crew will utilize suppression tactics to help contain the fire. The U.S. Forest Service said it expects more crews and resources to come and help them fight the fire on Saturday.

The Carson Valley and surrounding areas may be impacted by the smoke and light ashfall throughout the day and into the evening hours based on the previous night's fire growth and fire conditions today, according to the U.S. Forest Service.

The following locations and their surrounding areas are under a mandatory evacuation, according to the Alpine County Sheriff's Office:

According to Cal Fire, 2020 was one of the most severe fire seasons on record as 9,917 wildfires burned 4.2 million acres. Over 9,000 structures were destroyed, and 31 people (civilians and firefighters) were killed.

California also experienced its first "Gigafire" because of the August Complex Fire, burning over 1 million acres by itself. Four of California's top five largest wildfires in state history happened in 2020.

If you live in a wildfire-prone zone, Cal Fire suggests creating a defensible space around your home. Defensible space is an area around a building in which vegetation and other debris are completely cleared. At least 100 feet is recommended.

The Department of Homeland Security suggests assembling an emergency kit that has important documents, N95 respirator masks, supplies to grab with you if you’re forced to leave at a moment’s notice. The agency also suggests signing up for local warning system notifications and know your community’s evacuation plans best to prepare yourself and your family in cases of wildfires.

Some counties use Nixle alerts to update residents on severe weather, wildfires, and other news. To sign up, visit www.nixle.com or text your zip code to 888777 to start receiving alerts.

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